Curiosity Rover on Mars taking a selfie photo.

Curiosity Rover Martian Panoramic

Martian 360 Degree Panoramic By The Curiosity Rover.

The Curiosity Rover, operated by the NASA, sends back loads of data from the red planet. This time it sent a bunch of images that the space agency was able to stitch together into a 360-degree panoramic image. To make the image a full sphere we had to add more to the sky. Check out the 360-degree panoramic below of the rover at the Namib Dune.


The panoramic image is best viewed in full screen.

The curiosity rover is about the size of a car and is exploring select parts of the Red Planet, Mars, as part of NASA‘s Mars Science Laboratory mission (MSL). Curiosity was launched from Cape Canaveral (LC-41), Florida on November 26, 2011 on board an Atlas V rocket. Curiosity landed on Mars on  August 6, 2012 and as of Feb 7, 2016 has spend a total of 1280 days on the Martian planet, performing experiments, taking measurements and of course taking photos. The Curiosity rover has even sent back a very cool “selfie” (click link to see full resolution image).

Curiosity Rover on Mars taking a martian selfie photo.

The rover’s goals include: investigation of the Martian climate and geology; assessment of whether the selected field site inside Gale Crater has ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life, including investigation of the role of water; and planetary habitability studies in preparation for future human exploration.

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Curiosity‘s design will serve as the basis for the planned Mars 2020 rover. In December 2012, Curiosity‘s two-year mission was extended indefinitely.

For more information and up to date notifications of Curiosity’s adventures on the planet visit http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/. You can also visit the Wikipedia page set up for Curiosity at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curiosity_(rover). All images on this page are copyright to NASA and/or JPL. We photoshopped in some sky to make the image 360 x 180 degree to be viewed in a spherical projection.

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